For any and all occasions

11 November 2011

SongsAbout.com is “a database of ready-to-use playlists about holidays, current events and interesting topics of every kind!” Even better, they’re posted a little in advance; their Veterans Day selections came out on November 3rd.

The material is derived from the Green Book of Songs®, offered as a subscription service. They admit up front in their FAQ that they can’t possibly get everything:

Some songs are regarded as, frankly, too complex to full classify in this Database. For example, Emmylou Harris’s “The Pearl” covers profound themes of God and mankind that resist efforts to recognize it adequately. There are numerous other such cases, and we thank you for accepting the inevitable limitations within which this Database operates.

Which statement, modest as it is, was enough to insure their inclusion here.

15-year-old goes retro

22 August 2011

Tavi Gevinson, who’s been blogging at Style Rookie for four years, has several side projects, including mixes at 8tracks.com. This particular one I found delightful, especially in view of the fact that she wasn’t around for any of these songs when they first appeared. There’s no list attached, but you can read it here.

Bring on the Nineties

12 August 2011

So far as I know, I’ve never done a 1990s compilation of any sort, and this may have something to do with the fact that I spent much of that decade avoiding record stores and such. Fortunately, Apocalypstick is here to fill the embarrasing gap with an inspiring 24-track 90s mix, and what’s more, she was kind enough to put it up on Spotify. More than this, one should not presume to ask.

2 1/2 Weeks

23 July 2011

Dear me, it’s been almost a year since I picked up the burner. And it took Rebecca Black to rouse me from my torpor. 2½ Weeks is an 18-track compilation covering, well, a little over 2½ weeks, starting of course with “Friday.” A hint to you songwriters out there: we need more good Wednesday and Thursday stuff.

Cover art, Wendex 111146-2Track listing for 111146-2:

  1. Rebecca Black: Friday
  2. Sam Cooke: Another Saturday Night
  3. Spanky and Our Gang: Sunday Mornin’
  4. The Mamas and the Papas: Monday, Monday
  5. The Moody Blues: Tuesday Afternoon (Forever Afternoon)
  6. Lisa Loeb and Nine Stories: Waiting for Wednesday
  7. Giles, Giles and Fripp: Thursday Morning
  8. The Cure: Friday I’m in Love
  9. Elton John: Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting
  10. The Clique: Sugar on Sunday
  11. The Boomtown Rats: I Don’t Like Mondays
  12. The Rolling Stones: Ruby Tuesday
  13. The Guess Who: A Wednesday in Your Garden
  14. Nilsson: (Thursday) Here’s Why I Didn’t Go to Work Today
  15. The Easybeats: Friday on My Mind
  16. Bay City Rollers: Saturday Night
  17. The Monkees: Pleasant Valley Sunday
  18. Bangles: Manic Monday

Rules made to be broken

28 May 2011

A paragraph from Nick Hornby’s novel High Fidelity:

To me, making a tape is like writing a letter — there’s a lot of erasing and rethinking and starting again. A good compilation tape, like breaking up, is hard to do. You’ve got to kick off with a corker, to hold the attention (I started with “Got to Get You Off My Mind”, but then realized that she might not get any further than track one, side one if I delivered what she wanted straightaway, so I buried it in the middle of side two), and then you’ve got to up it a notch, or cool it a notch, and you can’t have white music and black music together, unless the white music sounds like black music, and you can’t have two tracks by the same artist side by side, unless you’ve done the whole thing in pairs and … oh, there are loads of rules.

I might actually follow these once in a while, but I don’t make a habit of it.

Listen while I play

9 April 2011

Since I haven’t had much going on here myself, I’ll point you to “Songs for Tambourine Hands”, suggested by Tiny Mix Tapes, featuring about an hour’s worth of shakin’ action, without once even mentioning that green thing brandished by the Lemon Pipers, which you’ve heard too many times already. It does, however, feature Beck’s “Black Tambourine” (from Guero), which would have offset it nicely.

Show some Enthusiasm

3 January 2011

Liz Enthusiasm and Sean T. Drinkwater of Freezepop suggest this collection of songs that inspired their particular brand of synthpop. As a Freezepop fan, I give it two controller-addled thumbs up.

It’s a security update

1 December 2010

That’s what WordPress told us, anyway, so here we are at 3.0.2 3.0.3 3.0.4. Secure, we hope.

Iterations

15 August 2010

Once upon a time, I discovered that at least three songs titled “Run, Run, Run” had made the pop charts. Repeating words seemed to be a common theme; I knocked this out originally as a cassette, and with some minor changes (including all three “Run” songs for once) it’s now on a CD-R. The strange four-legged creature was spotted selling hosiery forty or so years ago, so she’s probably heard some of these tunes.

Cover art, Wendex 111145-2Track listing for 111145-2:

  1. Abba: I Do (x 5)
  2. Neil Diamond: Cherry (x 2)
  3. Andrea True Connection: More (x 3)
  4. Ohio Express: Yummy (x 3)
  5. Cher: Bang (x 2)
  6. Tommy James and the Shondells: Mony (x 2)
  7. The Hollies: Stop (x 3)
  8. Hank Ballard and the Midnighters: Let’s Go (x 3)
  9. The Byrds: Turn (x 3)
  10. The Sandpipers: Louie (x 2)
  11. The Castaways: Liar (x 2)
  12. Miriam Makeba: Pata (x 2)
  13. The Beau Brummels: Laugh (x 2)
  14. The Beach Boys: Fun (x 3)
  15. Don Covay and the Goodtimers: Mercy (x 2)
  16. The Buckinghams: Mercy (x 3)
  17. Gene McDaniels: Chip (x 2)
  18. The Dixie Cups: Iko (x 2)
  19. The Music Machine: Talk (x 2)
  20. Alive & Kicking: Tighter (x 2)
  21. The Magic Lanterns: Shame (x 2)
  22. The Playmates: Beep (x 2)
  23. The Rolling Stones: Doo (x 5) *
  24. The Third Rail: Run (x 3)
  25. The Supremes: Run (x 3)
  26. Jo Jo Gunne: Run (x 3)
  27. The Archies: Sugar (x 2)
  28. The Jamies: Summertime (x 2)
  29. Major Lance: Um (x 6)

* Also known as “Heartbreaker.”

Three dot oh

17 June 2010

We’re now running WordPress 3.0. I hope everything still works. Not that there’s that much to break, of course.

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